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Climate Change and the Oceans:<br>Regulating the Seas to Protect the Atmosphere & Vice Versa, October 2, 2008

Climate Change and the Oceans:
Regulating the Seas to Protect the Atmosphere & Vice Versa

October 2, 2008, Columbia, South Carolina

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Hosted by the University of South Carolina School of Law, a Distinguished Panel presented on the topic of Climate Change and the Oceans: Regulating the Seas to Protect the Atmosphere & Vice Versa at 2:30 p.m. on October 2, 2008 at the USC School of Law in room 135.

Professor William Rodgers, holder of the Stimson Bullitt chair at the University of Washington School of Law, presented on “Ground Zero on Climate Change: Multiple Stressors, Alaska Natives, and the End of Oil”. Professor Rodgers talk linked legal events related to climate change ranging from the spill of the Exxon Valdez to the flooding of the Village of Kivalina. Dr. Felicia Coleman, a biology professor at Florida State University, presented on the physiological and behavioral trade-offs organisms make in changing environments to ensure their reproductive success, as well as on the management trade-offs we humans must make to ensure the sustainability of fisheries and the ecosystems that support them. Dr. William C.G. Burns, a faculty member at Santa Clara University Law School, presented an assessment of the potential impacts of ocean acidification on ocean species and ecosystems, and discussed one potential approach seeking to induce major greenhouse gas emitting nations to address the issue: initiating actions under the dispute resolution mechanisms provided for under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and the United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement. The panel was moderated by Cinnamon Carlarne, who recently joined the University of South Carolina School of Law from the University of Oxford, where she was the Harold Woods Research Fellow in Environmental Law at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies and the Faculty of Law and a Junior Research Fellow at Wadham College.

A reception co-hosted by the University of South Carolina School of the Environment and the South Carolina LowCountry Center for Humans and Nature followed. Proceedings will be published in the spring 2009 issue of the Southeastern Environmental Law Journal.

This event was free and open to the public.

Videos of the Oceans and Climate Change Panel discussions are available: